Friday, June 5, 2020

Writing Warriors United Spotlight #author #Interview with Anne Schroeder


We are delighted to welcome Anne Schroeder to Writing Warriors United 





What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? 


As a teen, I fell in love with the American Western writer Zane Grey: Riders of the Purple Sage, The Mysterious Rider, The Light of the Western Stars, The Lone Star Ranger. Combining romance, western setting and a strong hero created a desire to write stories that substituted women as the hero. I later discovered Lavryl Spencer and added sympathetic angst and a woman’s heart to my Writer’s Box of tricks. 


What is the first book that made you cry? 


A romance about a discarded mistress of Charles I. Bawled my eyes out. 


Does writing energize or exhaust you? 


Being in “the zone” makes me ecstatic like being in love. 


What are common traps for aspiring writers?


1. Rushing to publication. 
2. Wasting readers’ precious time. 
3. Spending money for things a writer should learn to do for themselves. 
4. Making the same goofy mistake more than 10 times. 
5. Taking oneself too seriously. 


Amazon



What is your writing Kryptonite? 


Anymore, sitting at the computer for hours. I have to get up every hour for 10 minutes. Set my timer. Get those legs pumping. 


What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer? 


I’ve attended a fair number of writer workshops and spent time chatting up my fellow attendees. That’s how the solitary guy at breakfast turns out to be an editor for a magazine that later names your book the best non-traditional western of the year. My email contact list contains well-known authors. But it was my writers group of “unknowns” who really helped me. Most of the books I read are written by non-famous authors. 


How did publishing your first book change your process of writing? 


Reading reviews in Amazon stunned me because readers took my work so seriously. I choose an unknown-to-me reviewer and keep them in mind as I write my next book. 


What was the best money you ever spent as a writer? 


Early writer conferences. Writer’s Market. I used to “X” out the markets I would never submit to and then submit to the ones that remained. Seeing my short stories and essays in print encouraged me to write more. 


What was an early experience where you learned that language had power? 


My first book, a creative non-fiction memoir, contained some lazy errors. Before POD printing, 4000 copies were printed. The book became a regional classic and sold out. My careless research came back to haunt me. Twenty years later, I’m now revising it. I hope people find the new edition. The take-away was to never let a book go before it’s the best it can be. 


What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel? 


Isn’t it always one that we write ourselves??? Mine is a novella, Willa Cather’s Death Comes to the Archbishop. Another American western author. 

Amazon


As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal? 


I believe I was channeled by an Indian girl named Maria Ines to write her story. So her. 


What does literary success look like to you? 


Keeping mind, body and spirit in balance.  Finding opportunities to change lives and deepen hearts while maintaining balance with my husband. This can be harder than it seems. I know a lot of divorced writers. 


What’s the most difficult thing about writing characters from the opposite sex? 


Keeping their mannerisms and dialogue true. I’ve read women-written novels where Indian boys cry when they get hurt. Give me a break! 

Amazon


Have you read anything that made you think differently about fiction? 


Non-fiction is about facts and dates. Fiction is about the emotional truth and it can be more real and authentic than actual life. All good fiction should change our lives and the depth of our soul. 


How do you select the names of your characters? 


If I’m deep enough into the story the characters do the choosing. 



Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find? 


No, but then I don’t write mysteries. I tie up all loose story lines and threads. Readers hate dangling. 


What was your hardest scene to write? 


The ones where I cry while I write. 


What is your favorite childhood book? 


A monthly girls magazine, “Calling all Girls.” Short stories. A gift from my grandparents that made me become a writer. 

Amazon



What is the most difficult part of your artistic process? 


Trimming the extra words. I’m an overwriter. Tight editing is like pulling teeth for me. But it’s easier to trim my own work. It hurts less. 


When you die – what would you like the universe to say to you as you walk into the next life? 


“She mattered so much in my life.” 

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Friday, May 8, 2020

Writing Warriors United Spotlight Author Interview with Ester Lopez

Writing Warriors United Spotlight Author Interview with Ester Lopez



What literary pilgrimages have you gone on?
Over the years, I’ve been to several conferences, too numerous to mention, but the most memorable, where I learned the most was in 2013. It was an RWA convention in Atlanta and the main topic was ‘Indie Publishing.’ All workshops were PACKED! I learned so much and that is the one event that started my “Indie” career.


What is the first book that made you cry?
It was so long ago, but the one I remember was actually the story of Romeo and Juliet. While we read that in school, the movie version came out (with Olivia Hussey and Leonard Whiting) and we got extra credit for watching it. So, I cried twice over the same story.





Does writing energize or exhaust you?
It energizes me!



What are common traps for aspiring writers?
Thinking you aren’t ready. I’ve been writing journals and scribbling notes for years, but when I decided I wanted to write as a career, I made myself an office space and I sit there to do my writing. They need to take it seriously, make a “writing area” and try to make a regular time for writing. (I fail at that part, but trying to establish one is important)


What is your writing Kryptonite?
By Kryptonite, I take it you mean ‘downfall.’ Mine is procrastination-waiting for the right time. In actuality, if I sit down and just start writing, things start happening. I think I’m more worried about NOT having enough time to write when I do sit down.




What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?
I’ve met a lot of authors like me, who are trying to get our names out there. They write different genres, but we try to meet up at the various book signing events. Lately, all of them have been cancelled. We keep in touch online through Facebook and Messenger by offering encouragement and praise. Here are some of them: Kimberley O’Malley, Katherine L.E. White, Adrienne Dunning, Carrie Humphrey, Maria Elena Alonso-Sierra, and Victoria Saccenti. Some of them are prolific writers and makes me want to write more.


How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?
After taking those workshops at the 2013 RWA Conference, I changed the way I ‘finish’ my books. The process I use to write stayed the same. I use worksheets I got from various online classes on characterization and I flesh out my main characters. Then, I figure out their Goals, Motivation, and Conflict for each of them. Sometimes I do the same for secondary characters. Then, I use the Snowflake Method, which helps me focus on the story, building it a little at a time.



What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?
Originally, I think it was joining RWA for the first time, because it led me to a better education in writing and the process of getting a book published. And the 2013 Convention (an additional expense) which led me to self-publish my first book.



What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?
When I was five years old, we moved to Puerto Rico and I was forced to learn Spanish. That’s when I learned that language had power-to communicate to other people.


What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?
One that has stayed with me for many years was “To Kill A Mockingbird.”


As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?
I’ve never thought about that, but my name, Ester, is a derivative of Estrella, which means star. So maybe a twinkling star as an avatar?



What does literary success look like to you?
Making enough money from the sale of my books to support myself financially.


What’s the most difficult thing about writing characters from the opposite sex?
Realizing that men don’t ‘think’ as much as women, or the same as women.


Have you read anything that made you think differently about fiction?
Not really, other than some fiction is much better than other fiction


How do you select the names of your characters?
Some of them come to me. Otherwise, I look for a name that has a meaning that would make sense in the story.


Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?
Not intentionally, unless it has something to do with the story.




What was your hardest scene to write?
The sex scenes!


What is your favorite childhood book?
When I was younger, I would go to the library every two weeks and check out several books at a time. My sister and I would compete to see how many we could read in that time period. She would always win because she ended up reading my books, too, so I can’t remember any specific book. My favorite types of books were the ones with a ‘happily ever after.’


What is the most difficult part of your artistic process?
Getting my butt in the chair!


When you die – what would you like the universe to say to you as you walk into the next life?
There goes a woman who followed her dreams.

Esta Lopez Links:

Writing On The Edge Of Reality
 www.esterlopez.comwww.AuthorBlogSpot.esterlopez.com 
The Abduction, Revenge, Betrayed, The Quest and Between Heaven and Earth are now available in print and eBook formats at Amazon.com andwherever books are sold.

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Thursday, May 7, 2020

Five Ways to Write Yourself Out of a Corner





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Friday, April 24, 2020

Writing Warriors United Spotlight #Author #Interview with Anna Mocikat @anna_mocikat


Writing Warriors United Spotlight Author Interview with Anna Mocikat



What literary pilgrimages have you gone on?

I have been a professional writer for more than 20 years now… my whole life is a pilgrimage 😉


What is the first book that made you cry?

Mio, My Mio by Astrid Lindgren


Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Although I love nothing more than writing, it exhausts me. After writing for more than six hours, I feel as if somebody had drained me of my life energy. I believe my life energy goes directly into my characters.


What are common traps for aspiring writers?

I would say the most common trap is getting distracted by too many ideas and never finishing a book. I always advise aspiring writers to only focus on one book at a time…even if it can be very tempting to start out with new projects, especially when the current book reaches a point where it becomes actual work and not only pleasure. Write down new ideas into a notebook and stick to one book until it’s finished!


What is your writing Kryptonite?

Noise. I’m a very noise sensitive person in general and can’t focus on writing at all in a noisy environment. I need a peaceful place to work and always listen to music over soundproof headphones.


What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I am a member of the #WritingCommunity on Twitter and can only recommend every writer to check it out. I found support and valuable advice there and meanwhile proudly call some of the writers there my friends.


How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

I can’t say that it really changed my writing process. However, I try to make every new book better than the previous one. And I listen to the feedback readers and fans give me.


What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Covers and artwork designed by excellent pros. Although my books are being published by a publisher, I provide my own covers. I work with two different artists who create my covers and additional artwork. It might be a costly option, but this way, I can bring my exact vision on the covers. And no matter what happens, even if I should change the publisher or decide to continue by self-publishing one day, the covers in my series will always match each other, being designed by the same artist.


What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?
I can’t say that I have a favorite, but I really enjoy reading indie authors. Some of their books are better than a lot of the output the big publishers produce.


As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

I don’t need neither since I have three dogs, who are also my assistants. My writer’s life would often be boring without them. They are amazing!



What does literary success look like to you?

Of course, I want to sell as many copies as possible (who doesn’t?) but what makes me truly happy is when I get feedback from readers who are really excited about my books. I want people to have a good time with my books and be able to escape reality for a couple of hours.


What’s the most difficult thing about writing characters from the opposite sex?

I have zero difficulties with writing male characters. We’re all humans after all, aren’t we?


How do you select the names of your characters?
Usually, they come to me without much thinking, unless I need names from foreign languages and cultures, then I research them.


Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?
Yes! I love Easter Eggs and have plenty of them in my books. References to movies, video games, books, and pop culture.


What was your hardest scene to write?

The hardest scenes for me to write are romantic ones. I’m always concerned they could turn out too corny… Kudos to writers who fill whole books with that!


What is your favorite childhood book?
Everything by Astrid Lindgren. Her books inspired me to become a writer back in elementary school.


What is the most difficult part of your artistic process?
Editing. I have a love/hate relationship with it, haha. On the one side, I’m a perfectionist and would edit my books endlessly if I wouldn’t set myself deadlines. On the other side, it annoys the crap out of me.


When you die – what would you like the universe to say to you as you walk into the next life?
“You did well, Anna. You entertained a lot of people with your work and made their lives more fun. Now, for your next incarnation, I’m planning something for you, which is less of a roller coaster ride.”


Find Anna over at Amazon!  



About Anna Mocikat


Anna Mocikat was born in Warsaw, Poland, but spent most of her life in Germany where she attended film school, worked as a screenwriter and a game writer for several years.
Her "MUC" novels have been nominated for the most prestigious awards for Fantasy and Science-Fiction in Germany. In 2016 Anna Mocikat moved to the USA where she continued her writing career in English. She lives in Greenville, South Carolina.



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Friday, April 17, 2020

Writing Warriors United Spotlight Author Interview with Katherine Mezzacappa




Writing Warriors United Spotlight Author Interview with Katherine Mezzacappa 






Katherine Mezzacappa who also writes as Katie Hutton and Kate Zarrelli.

    What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? 
    Age 15 I had a holiday in Thomas Hardy country I have never forgotten. I’ve stayed in the house where George Mackay Brown was born, in Stromness, Orkney. And I’ve visited writers’ homes, such as Wordsworth’s Cottage, Grasmere, the Brontë parsonage at Haworth, Dickens’s houses in Broadstairs and London, Yeats’s home in Sligo, Henry James’s house at Rye, Dr. Johnson’s London home, and Joseph Conrad’s grave in Canterbury cemetery, round the corner from where I used to live.


    What is the first book that made you cry? 
    Tess of the d’Urbervilles. I was 13 and a lonely kid so I used to read a lot. With a book you’re never alone. Now I am really, really grateful for that strong literary foundation.


    Does writing energize or exhaust you? 
    It energises. I feel so bad if I don’t get ‘my words’ done every day. I sleep poorly or not at all if I haven’t written.


    What are common traps for aspiring writers? 
    There are a few and I’ve probably fallen into them all. One is trying to write like someone else. You have to write what you feel but at the same time you can’t treat writing as just your own therapy, as you’re writing for an audience, who will probably not find your personal challenges as absorbing as you think they are. Think how you feel when someone shows you an entire family album of people you don’t know. So I’d say learn from your experience, but transform it. And don’t send your manuscript to an agent or publisher until you’ve really made it as good as it can be.


    What is your writing Kryptonite? 
    Sadly, and this is going to sound very curmudgeonly, it’s other people – some other people. I think writers have to be super-disciplined (and I think this is a good rule if you are not a writer too) to spend time with those who give you energy, encourage you, can be constructively critical, and to whom you too can give back. Not the time wasters.


    What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer? Anne Booth, prolific children and YA writer now exploring adult fiction too. She’s the gentlest and kindest person I know and I’m sorry I’m not more like her. She read me the riot act sitting in a pub near Canterbury in February 2016 about making excuses for not writing. Four years later I have a two book deal with a major publisher, have written two further novels, published a novella, am revising another novella for publication and have got numerous short stories out there. Every writer should have someone like Anne! Other author friends are Julie Cohen (her Louis and Louise is about to be made into a film) and Maria McCann, both of whom I knew professionally first as they assessed two novels for me. Patricia O’Reilly and Catherine Kullmann in Dublin are both great writers of historical fiction; Patricia is a great teacher and networker, and there is nothing Catherine doesn’t know about research, and self-marketing. Watch this space also for authors Lorraine Rogerson, Liz Kershaw and Jane Wallace, my Arvon companions. Also Ian Sansom in Newtownards, a marvellously comic historical novelist, perceptive reviewer and teacher of creative writing without compare (as well as being just a delightful bloke). Then there is the Cill Rialaig residency Seven in Ireland: Marie Breen-Smyth, Sheila Armstrong, June Caldwell, Charleen Hurtubise, Olivia Fitzsimons, Emily Cooper. Great gas, and great support. I should mention my fellow Zaffre author Elizabeth Woodcraft, who is also a barrister and gave me fantastic guidance, not just concerning legal accuracy, but also how to build tension in a court scene. Who said writing was a lonely business?


    How did publishing your first book change your process of writing? 
    I’d published non-fiction before, and some short stories, but the first fiction book I published was with eXtasy, a romance. Their editorial process was second to none. With their help, picking up on inconsistencies and head-hops, a book written years ago and left in a drawer became something I am proud of, and made me a better writer in all genres I write in.


    What was the best money you ever spent as a writer? 
    Going to an Arvon residential in November 2016, for the people I met, and Ian Sansom’s tuition.


    What was an early experience where you learned that language had power? 
    Reading George Orwell’s 1984. He’s more right about the danger of doublethink than ever.


    What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel? 
    David McLaurin’s The Bishop of San Fernando. McLaurin writes like a mixture of Graham Green and Joseph Conrad, but he’s become a priest and doesn’t seem to be publishing now.





    As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal? 
    I always have to have a cat. Currently I’ve got Magnus and Seánie.


    What does literary success look like to you? 
    Actually I find that easier than writing about my own sex. I’m attracted to men, so it’s fun to write about them.


    Have you read anything that made you think differently about fiction? 
    I’m not a big Dickens fan. He was so spiteful to his poor wife. Yet Nicholas Nickleby achieved the closure of dozens of abusive schools, more than any newspaper campaign could have.


    How do you select the names of your characters? 
    This is probably a bit ghoulish, but I write historical fiction, set in times when people moved about less than they do now, so I look at war memorials and churchyards in the places I’m setting my books, and choose names that recur.


    Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find? 
    Oh yes! Not telling…


    What was your hardest scene to write? 
    I’ve written a book set in Renaissance Italy which is currently with my agent, based on a real event, where a girl from an orphanage was used as a test bench for the virility of Vincenzo Gonzaga, so that he could make a dynastic marriage. The contemporary correspondence is never written from her point of view, but it is apparent that she fell for this man she spent only three nights with. I wrote a scene where she tells him what she hopes for her own future, only to find that he’s fallen asleep.


    What is your favorite childhood book? 
    Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Tom Kitten.


    What is the most difficult part of your artistic process? 
    When I do the ninth reread and think the book is crap, even though I’d been pleased with it up to then.


    When you die – what would you like the universe to say to you as you walk into the next life? You wrote something that brightened up a dull day.



    Links:




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Monday, April 13, 2020

Motivational Monday - Why You're Still Waiting to Get Started on Your Dreams

Have you ever had this conversation with yourself?

I really want to start on this project, it is going to be amazing, but I must wait. It’s not time yet. I will start on [INSERT DATE HERE].
I’ll start the business I have been researching and consumed about after the kids graduate from college?
I’ll just wait until Memorial Day to begin my exercise program.

We’ve all done it—Seriously, been there, done that. There always seems to be a good reason not to get started right here and now. A self-imposed barrier we create to ensure procrastination born out of fear.

Consider these excuses. Is one of them yours?


  • You’re waiting for the perfect time. Are you waiting for the stars to align and the heavens to tap you on the shoulder and give you permission? You’ll be waiting for a long time. The time will never be perfect to get started on something significant. Hello, life is never risk-free so just do it!

  • You’re waiting for something else to happen first. Maybe you’re waiting for the kids to move out or for the mortgage to be paid off. Or you’re waiting until your next promotion. Or you’re waiting for some internal drama to pass. 

  • You’re waiting until you have more money. There’s never enough money. You’ll find the money you need along the way.


  • You’re waiting for Monday, or the first of the month, or the first of the year. So many people wait until Monday to start a diet, -- which makes no sense to me because Sunday is the first day of the week--or the first of the month to begin an exercise routine. Then the first of the month lands on a Wednesday and we say we will wait until Sunday – are you seeing a pattern here? There’s nothing magical about any date on the calendar. The calendar is a man-made invention to keep time. If you are feeling it now, do it now.


  • You’re waiting until you know more. Some people believe they need to know every shred of information related to their quest before they can get started. This simply isn’t true. You don’t need to know a lot to begin, all you need is the desire and commitment.


  • You don’t really think you’ll be successful. It makes sense that you won’t get started if you believe you can’t be successful. This is a sign that you might need to start with a smaller objective. A perfect goal is one that you believe you can achieve that also excites you.


  • You’re afraid you will be successful. This sounds counter-intuitive; however, many people are afraid of success. We may not like our current situation, but we are comfortable. Let’s face it, comfortable is easy, predictable, and there is no risk involved. We would rather have predictable misery than uncertain success. There’s no way to predict 100% what your life will be like if you’re successful.


  • You’re scared. If you’re honest with yourself, this is the most likely reason you’re postponing the pursuit of your dreams. Whether you dread the feeling of being hungry on a diet, sweating on a treadmill, or making a fool out of yourself with a failed business, you’re simply afraid.
In most cases, it’s better to get started immediately, rather than waiting for just the right time to get started. Even a little progress is better than no progress. Have faith in yourself and jump in with both feet.


You can’t be successful if you don’t get started. Your dreams are waiting for you.



I love to hear your feedback! Leave a comment and let me know what you think and if the post was helpful! If you want more information, or assistance shoot me an email at writingwarriorsunited@gmail.com or ping me on Twitter @AmyJRomine.


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Friday, April 10, 2020

Writing Warriors United Spotlight Author Interview Kimberly O'Malley



Writing Warriors United Spotlight Author Interview Kimberly O'Malley







What literary pilgrimages have you gone on?
Not sure that I have been on a writing pilgrimage. I do love a good writing retreat, if that counts. Two of my other NC author friends and I try to do this twice a year. We stay in a basic hotel in the middle of the state and write. But we also share ideas, etc. And laugh. And drink.


What is the first book that made you cry?
Old Yeller


Does writing energize or exhaust you?
Both? It depends on the day. Some books, and scenes within them, are harder to write than others. The bits that make me cry exhaust me. But writing itself is energizing, especially when you find yourself in the zone and thousands of words flow onto the page.


What are common traps for aspiring writers?
Trying to go it alone is a trap. You need people to bounce ideas. You need someone who cares enough to tell you what you just slaved over is really crap. Personally, I thought my first book was going to set the world on fire. I was wrong…


What is your writing Kryptonite?
Lack of time is my personal Kryptonite. I work full time and have a family. Our two kids are in high school and both athletes. I barely have time to breathe. So, writing, and all that goes along with that, can’t always be my priority sadly.



What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?
I have built a nice network of somewhat local and not so local authors. In NC, I have Carrie D. Humphrey and Adrienne Dunning. Then there’s the fabulous Ester Lopez. There are also a ton of folks who are my virtual support on social media. We have the writing weekends I mentioned above. We travel to signings together. We write all different genres with very little overlap, and yet that does not matter. We are a network of support for each other. We trade ideas about marketing, social media, life stuff. Two of us have kids graduating high school this year, so there’s that. That requires a lot of support!



How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?
I’m not sure that it did. Each book makes me a better writer, not just the first. With each book, I am forced to see what my problem areas are, such as too much passive voice, using the word so or just too often, telling versus showing, etc.



What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?
The book The Emotional Thesaurus!! I love this book so much. As I mentioned above, I struggle with show versus tell a lot. This book has saved me!



What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?
From the time I was very young, my mother always told me I could be anything I set my mind to. I miss her.



What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?
Beowulf






As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?
I’m torn between a wolf and a hawk. I love dogs, and wolves are so majestic and free. I love their pack mentality. On the other hand, who doesn’t want to fly?



What does literary success look like to you?
Superficially, being able to support myself through my writing so that I wouldn’t have to work full time. But honestly, hearing from a reader that something I wrote touched them, or helped them through a rough patch, is success to me.



What’s the most difficult thing about writing characters from the opposite sex?
I have never been a man. And while I have lived with one for over 25 years, I cannot crawl inside his brain. But would I really want to? LOL! It’s difficult to write the male perspective since I am not one.



Have you read anything that made you think differently about fiction?
No.


How do you select the names of your characters?
Naming characters is one of my favorite things about being a writer. I love names. I love to look at their origin and meanings. I love that names move in and out of popularity over the years. Names come to me. I have the name before the character is fleshed out. Sometimes, that doesn’t work, as the name just does not fit him or her. Oddly enough, while I enjoy first names, I struggle with surnames.



Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?
Have you heard the term Easter egg? I have a notes page in my phone with words that people have mentioned. Or dared me to work into a sentence. Sometimes, they are a phrase instead. An example would be, “Oh, for the love of God.” I also include little snippets from my own life or of those of the people around me. You will always find someone wearing flip flops or eating pizza with pineapple on it.


What was your hardest scene to write?
My hardest scene ever was one in Saving Quinn in which a firefighter dies in the line of duty. He is a secondary character, but I cannot read it even now without crying. My last contemporary romance, Coming Back, is the hardest book I have ever written. It follows up Saving Quinn with the fiancée of the deceased firefighter. I was maybe 16K into it when I lost my Mom to Alzheimer’s. So, there I was in a hotel in Pennsylvania, hundreds of miles from home, trying to write about grief when I was experiencing it first-hand. I put that book away and did not touch it again for the better part of a year.


What is your favorite childhood book?
My favorite was anything with an animal in it. I loved Misty of Chincoteague and that series. I also loved The Black Stallion series. Do you see the theme?


What is the most difficult part of your artistic process?
Lack of time and time management. Because I don’t get to just write all day, I am always pressed for time. And then FB and YouTube sucks me into something other than writing. I have gotten better at blocking off time; time for writing, time for catching up with social media, time to have fun and avoid burn out.


When you die – what would you like the universe to say to you as you walk into the next life?
You made a difference.
    

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